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China Urban Development Review

Abstract

China is undergoing one of the fastest and largest urbanisation processes in the world. This process has two facets, one is the incremental expansion of urban populations and cities, while the other is that urban quality is increasingly gaining people’s attention.

With this paper we wish to call together observers to review the urban development process, and we want to be advisors and facilitators for urban development through collecting cases and igniting people’s passion for improving our cities. We live and work in cities, there is no reason to sit and do nothing when our cities deserve more care.


Regenerative Cities in China

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Abstract

A new type of urbanization is needed. One that reflects a different type of development, also known as the New Normal which is currently gaining widespread support throughout China. The New Normal understands the substantial changes affecting China (namely a decline in the availability of inexpensive land and cheap labour, slower economic growth and, above all, increasingly exacerbating environmental distresses) and responds by promoting a new kind of people-centred development that favours slower economic growth, people well-being, innovation, domestic market development and that is particularly devoted to environmental protection and sustainability.

In order to ensure the successful implementation of the New Normal, a new model of urbanization that encourages and supports this new type of socio-economic development is needed. It is hereby recommended that cities in China start their transformation to become Regenerative Cities. Given the environmentally degraded conditions of many Chinese cities and ecosystems, a regenerative type of urban development that is able to establish a symbiotic and mutually beneficial relationship with the environment is not only recommended but urgently needed.

 

Imagine a Regenerative City

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Abstract

This report draws on the rich discussions at the 3rd Future of Cities Forum surrounding the vision of regenerative cities. It looks at a selection of the case studies presented at the Forum to outline the value creation resulting from regenerative urban development, the obstacles in the way of progress, and tools to help overcome those challenges.

Regenerative Urban Development: a Roadmap to the City we need

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Abstract

Human impacts on the world’s landscapes are dominated by the ecological footprints of urban areas that now stretch across much of the globe. The World Future Council’s Regenerative Cities programme seeks to identify concepts and policies that help cities to harness their own regenerative capacity in order to reconcile the their ecological footprints with their geographical magnitude. The planning and management of new cities as well as the retrofitting of existing ones needs to undergo a profound paradigm shift. The urban metabolism must be transformed from its current operation as an inefficient and wasteful linear system into a resource-efficient and circular system.

Towards the Regenerative City

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Abstract

The planning of new cities as well as the retrofitting of existing ones needs to undergo a profound paradigm shift. The urban metabolism must be transformed from its current operation as an inefficient and wasteful linear input-output system into a resource-efficient and regenerative, circular system. This report is about operationalising and implementing the concept of regenerative cities.

Regenerative Cities

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Abstract

Creating regenerative cities primarily means one thing: initiating comprehensive political, financial and technological strategies for an environmentally restorative relationship between cities and the ecosystems from which they draw resources for their sustenance. Introducing “Agropolis”, “Petropolis” and “Ecopolis” this WFC brochure by WFC Honorary Councillor Herbert Girardet explains how such a healthy relationship can be built.