WFC Healthy Children Conference Closing Plenary

Conference Report “Healthy Planet, Healthy Children”

We have breached the safe planetary boundary for chemical pollution. The impact of this pollution has become more and more visible over the last years. Children are exposed to hundreds of chemicals, resulting in 1.7 million children dying before the age of 5 each year. To urge further action and highlight existing solutions, we held an online conference entitled “Healthy Planet, Healthy Children: Success Factors For A Future Without Toxics on May 19th 2022, in anticipation of Stockholm+50 and in partnership with the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) and Healthy Babies Bright Futures (HBBF), supported by the German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation, Nuclear Safety and Consumer Protection (BMUV), the German Federal Environment Agency (UBA), Michael Otto Foundation and Jua Foundation. The event gathered international, academic, NGO and policy experts, who shared their insights on how hazardous chemicals affect children’s health, discussed key success factors of chemical policies, and presented policies winning the Future Policy Award and a set of useful policy recommendations, in order to advance the protection from hazardous chemicals. Amongst them, please name all speakers here.

Watch the recorded Webinar: “Healthy Planet, Healthy Children: Success Factors For A Future Without Toxics”

Click here to read the full Conference Summary: Healthy Planet, Healthy Children: Success Factors for a Future without Toxics

 

In the aftermath of this important event and on the occasion of World Environment Day (5th June 2022), the World Future Council and the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) launched their new report “A Healthy Planet for Healthy Children”, which provides key facts on how hazardous chemicals affect children’s health, inspires with award -winning policies and highlights the most critical policy recommendations for a toxic-free future. You can find it at this link: https://bit.ly/3NJMbBW

About the new report “A Healthy Planet for Healthy Children – Policies for a Future without Toxics”

The report warns of the impact of hazardous chemicals on children and highlights useful policy recommendations and award-winning policies…

Handbook on advancing institutional child protection

In a new policy handbook for advancing institutional child protection of the World Future Council, we invite you to learn more about about One-Stop Centre model (OSC) as a cost-effective and easy-to-implement response to violence against children.

Webinar: Tackling Youth Unemployment

The reinforced Youth Guarantee will play a crucial role in tackling youth unemployment in Europe, especially in countries like Greece or Spain. In our web-event, we will discuss if and how a Green Sector offers a unique chance to involve young women and men endangered by economic exclusion, in particular by implementing the goals set out in the European Green Deal and the corresponding national Energy and Climate Plans.

Press Release: WFC goes Youth:Present

Youth:Present offers young people the possibility to discuss global problems, participate in political decision making and provide solutions.

Human Rights Council adopted resolution to realize the rights of children through a healthy environment

Children need to be protected from Hazardous Chemicals – the topic of our this year’s Future Policy Award.

Our new youth forum: WFC goes Youth:Present

It’s time to announce: Youth:Present. We are exciting to establish a global youth forum.

Announcement: International Child Rights Conference in Zanzibar

Sharing best practice and policy on child protection, justice and participation

Realising every child’s right to freedom from violence and to participation is a fundamental element of the Convention on the Rights of the Child. Recent estimates show that at least one billion children are victims of violence every year. Violence against girls and boys in all its forms compromises all children’s rights and leaves not only long-lasting scars on children’s lives but also weakens social and economic progress.

FPA 2015: Zanzibar’s Children’s Act is the winner of the Gold Award.

In 2009, Tanzania and its semi-autonomous island region of Zanzibar was one of the first countries in Africa to undertake a national study on violence against children. In response to its findings, and to streamline national child rights legislation, the Revolutionary Government of Zanzibar introduced a comprehensive children’s rights law. Zanzibar’s ‘Children’s Act’ was awarded the gold prize at our 2015 Future Policy Awards for its effective response to child abuse and violence and for its promotion and protection of child rights.

Following up on the awarding, the World Future Council is now organizing an international child rights conference in November in Zanzibar, offering participants, nominated by their ministries, from across Africa and internationally a platform to learn from the Zanzibar example and exchange best practice examples from their home countries.

 

Aims of the conference:

… to offer insights from Zanzibar’s Child Protection System and the Children’s Act to policy makers and technical experts from other jurisdictions

… to exchange best practice examples from countries across Africa and internationally on topics such as child rights, participation, child justice, protection and positive discipline

… to provide a platform and learn from each other and to mutually improve policies, practices and impacts for the benefit of children and young people, particularly those that are vulnerable

… to strengthen synergies and networks for multi-stakeholder dialogue and promote the ongoing improvement of child rights laws and policies through cross-border learning.

… to identify opportunities, trends and success factors for policy reform and progress in the child rights arena

International Child Rights Conference

Sharing best practice and policy on child protection, justice and participation

When?  28th – 30th November 2017

Where?   Zanzibar


Context of the conference:

With its specific target (16.2) on ending all forms of violence against children, ensuring their safety and protection as well as reiterating their rights to access justice and information, the 2030 Agenda adds further strong international impetus to ending violence against children. Good child rights laws, policies and practices and their effective implementation play a crucial role in meeting these aims and targets.

In the recent years, Zanzibar is increasingly working on the implementation of empowerment of children and women. A pioneering feature of the drafting phase of Zanzibar’s ‘Children’s Act’ was a child consultation process which provided young people with a strong role in the law’s development and led to a greater societal understanding of children’s rights. Another successful feature was the involvement of a wide range of relevant stakeholders (ministries, religious leaders, civil society groups etc) in the drafting phase and thereafter.

To promote a conducive policy environment to address child protection in Zanzibar a National Plan of Action to end violence against women and children (NAPVAC) (2011-2015), a national campaign and a child justice reform process were also undertaken. A very recent (2017) National Plan of Action to end Violence Against Women and Children (2017-2022) has also been introduced. Zanzibar’s Strategy for Growth and Reduction of Poverty (MKUZIII) stresses the importance of empowering women, protecting children, promoting gender equality and equity; all critical factors for Zanzibar’s economic and social transformation.

Contact

Kassid_square

Samia Kassid
Senior Project Manager

 

Shopping and Sustainability: Erasmus+ project to raise awareness in young people

WFC Project Manager Samia Kassid and Tina Stridde from Cotton made in Africa talk to students about child rights, child labour and sustainable shopping

If we talk about future generations, we must talk about young people. They are the decision-makers of the future – but what is oftentimes forgotten, they are decision-makers today as well: For most children, teenagers and young adults, the way they dress is an important form of self-expression, and therefore a vital part of their identity. But due to lack of awareness – and, very possibly, lack of funding – affordable clothes are most often the first choice. So how is a young person, who is not familiar with the production chain of the textile industry, and the various forms of exploitation within this chain, able to make sustainable decisions as a consumer?

Read more

International field trip on exemplary environmental education policy

Given the many challenges our societies and environment are facing, children and young people across the globe must be equipped to positively shape their future and be empowered to learn and live in an increasingly sustainable manner. Practical environmental education that is integrated across the curriculum has been shown to be a key solution offering a wide variety of benefits both for students, teachers, the environment and wider society.

In 2011 the U.S. State of Maryland introduced a pioneering Environmental Literacy Standard which mandates that all Maryland students are environmentally literate by graduation. Environmental literacy is now taught in very diverse and holistic methods throughout the school curriculum (often in great hands-on outdoor experiences such as restoring reefs and wetlands, planting trees and learning at outdoor environmental education centres). Maryland’s Environmental Literacy Standards was the 2015 winner of the WFC’s silver Future Policy Award, as it provides an excellent holistic model of sustainable and environmental education that has been implemented with the support of a broad coalition of partners.

International Workshop

Maryland, US, 12-14 October

The World Future Council’s Rights of Children (RoC) team is now bringing together Ministries and legislators who are interested in learning first-hand about this pioneering model in an international workshop in Maryland (12-14 October 2016). The legislators will learn about Maryland’s successful implementation of environmental literacy legislation, exchange best practice and identify potential policy reforms for their own countries and regions.

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Maryland’s Environmental Literacy Standards

In 2011, Maryland became the first US State to make environmental education obligatory for high-school students. The State Board of Education ruled that each local school system must provide a comprehensive, multi-disciplinary environmental education programme that is integrated into the general school curriculum.

While the teaching of environmental education is now required from pre-school to graduation, the focus is on all incoming Grade 9 students (14 and 15 year olds) who must complete a comprehensive environmental education programme that meets the Maryland Environmental Literacy Curriculum Standards.