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World Future Council mourns death of founding member and Honorary Councillor Sir James R. Mancham

The World Future Council is deeply saddened by the loss of founding member and Honorary Councillor, Sir James R. Mancham, who passed away on January 8, 2017, aged 77. Read more

UNCCD Monique Barbut and Alexandra Wandel FPA 17

UN desertification chief signs partnership agreement with World Future Council

2017 Future Policy Award celebrates world’s most effective policies to combat desertification

Hamburg/Bonn, 12 January 2017 – Monique Barbut, Executive Secretary of the United Nations Convention on Combating Desertification (UNCCD) has signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the World Future Council in Hamburg, Germany, to establish a framework of cooperation in the fight against desertification and land degradation. This is a key element in achieving the Sustainable Development Goals. Read more

Judge C.G. Weeramantry

World Future Council mourns death of founding member and Honorary Councillor Judge Weeramantry

The World Future Council is deeply saddened by the loss of founding member and Honorary Councillor, Judge C.G. Weeramantry who passed away in Colombo, Sri Lanka on 5 January 2017.

Judge Weeramantry was a Judge of the International Court of Justice (ICJ) from 1991 to 2000, serving as its Vice-President from 1997 to 2000 and a Judge of the Supreme Court of Sri Lanka from 1967 to 1972.

During his time as an ICJ judge, Weeramantry contributed to several landmark cases before the Court. These included a case on the illegality of the use and threat to use of nuclear weapons where he shared remarkable and poignant observations, and the case concerning the Gabcikovo-Nagymaros project which contributed to the furtherance of international sustainable development law.

In the course of his professional career of over five decades as lawyer, legal educator, domestic judge, international judge, author and lecturer, Judge Weeramantry played a leading role in several developing areas of the law. These included the illegality of nuclear weapons, sustainable development, rights of future generations, exploring the interface areas between law and religion and promoting cross cultural understanding.  He was also a passionate advocate of peace education which he believed should include teaching principles of international law at an early age.

He has written over twenty books, most of them extremely influential and translated into many languages, and lectured extensively on these topics in over forty countries.  His book, ‘Nuclear Weapons and Scientific Responsibility’ pioneered the concept of ethics in science, challenged the notion that science is neutral, and introduced the idea of a ‘Hippocratic oath’ for scientists. His book ‘Tread Lightly on the Earth’ offers a pronounced insight and analysis of the concerns of the world’s principal religions with the preservation and nurturing of the natural environment.

After stepping down from the ICJ, Weeramantry took up the position of President of the International Association of Lawyers Against Nuclear Arms, and continued advancing the application of international law for the benefit of peace and humanity in his new position. This included drafting, and presenting to the UN Security Council a seminal statement on the illegality of the preventive use of force, endorsed by over 200 prominent judges, legal scholars and lawyers from around the world. As IALANA President he also penned an influential public statement, in the wake of the Fukushima disaster, on the application of future justice principles to nuclear energy – in order to highlight its illegality and stupidity.

The Judge was founding Chair of the Centre for International Sustainable Development Law’s International Commission, and then, for 16 years, Patron‎ of the Centre, which is based at McGill University in Montreal, Cambridge University, the University of Nairobi, and the University of Chile.

Weeramantry also founded the Weeramantry International Centre for Peace Education and Research which produced a vast corpus of research and writing based on Weeramantry’s legal knowledge and philosophy for humanity.

Judge Weeramantry received a number of prestigious awards including the Sri Lankabhimanya (highest National Honour of Sri Lanka), Right Livelihood Award (‘Alternative Nobel Peace Prize’) and the UNESCO Peace Education Prize, which he received in recognition of his commitment and concrete undertakings in support of the concept and culture of peace through his career.

With this letter our heartfelt condolences go out to his family. Judge C.G. Weeramantry will be missed as a friend as well as a moral authority.

A Conversation with Kehkashan Basu and Pauline Tangiora

Two women, one mission: Our Councillor Pauline Tangiora and our Youth Ambassador Kehkashan Basu are two inspirational women working to make the world a better place. As a Maori elder, Pauline has been a respected advocate for the environment and indigenous issues for decades in her native New Zealand. Kehkashan is an Indian-born, devoted youth activist living in the United Arab Emirates, frequently travelling across the world to mobilise other young people in the movement for a green future.

During our Annual General Meeting in Hamburg, the two women provided us with an insight into their lives, their work and hopes for the WFC and made one thing clear: You don’t need to become a full-time activist travelling the world to make a difference – change starts at home.

What can we do to make the world a better place?

Kehkashan: Everybody can start by practising a sustainable lifestyle in the simplest way possible, just trying to think about the environmental impacts of everyday activities. If people choose to learn more about sustainability and spread awareness, a lot of things can be done. This also means that people need to respect the rights of others and take their views and opinions seriously.

Pauline: People need to respect each other. That is the first thing we need to teach our children: To respect ourselves and those around us.  It is also important that children are respected by the adults around them. And your actions will probably depend on the environment you live in. I live in a rural area and we have to catch our water and save it. So, everybody could contribute by putting a tank up by their house to catch the rain water. When children come to my house, they don’t turn taps on just like that because they know that water is the life and power of humanity.

Tell us a little bit about what you do

Kehkashan: In 2012, I started my youth organisation called “Green Hope”, which has the objective to carry forward the legacy of sustainable development and green economy by involving the children and youth of my region and also worldwide. We conduct conferences, workshops and academies to educate young people about what they can do to get involved in the sustainable development agenda and how they can spread awareness in their communities. But we don’t just talk about it. We also run small community projects so they can learn by doing. And we spread awareness through music, art, dance and drama because we feel the message is passed on easier that way.

Pauline: Personally, I wouldn’t even call it work. I walk alongside, especially alongside young people. I enjoy hearing their thoughts and ideas – and they listen to mine. I think in such conversations, young and old people can define the problems in the world very clearly. People from my generation should remember that we don’t have all the wisdom just because we are older. We should talk with young people to learn what they want and what they think the future will bring. If we don’t do that, we lose something.

Do you think that women or men are more concerned about the environment or more sensitive towards sustainability issues?

Pauline: In our community, we work together – male and female. We don’t say men are doing things better than women. We thank everyone in our community. We need to make sure that this remains the essence of who we are. And we have had many, many international calls, even from Germany, asking: ‘What can we do, we have a problem’ and I would say: ‘You need to work together. Men and women.’

Kehkashan: I think it really depends on the person and I don’t think it’s gender-specific. I am talking from personal experience. My group has an equal number of guys and girls who are equally passionate about what we do. So I think it really depends on the person as a whole and not their gender.

The Rights of Children commission is doing a really great job to secure the rights of children through national policies and legislation, for example to increase child participation and environmental literacy.

What are your expectations of or hopes for the WFC?

Kehkashan: The Rights of Children commission is doing a really great job to secure the rights of children through national policies and legislation, for example to increase child participation and environmental literacy. I think continuing this work and involving more young people is going to make a big difference in the world.

Pauline: The WFC has a very important role to play in the world, as it is not just working to change things but to actively make them better. And that is important, as you can’t just say “we have to change something”; you have to make things better through concrete action.

What changes have you seen over the years?

Kehkashan: When I started getting involved in sustainable development I was 8 years old. When I was 12, I started my own organisation and I think that was a huge changing point in my life because I learnt that working with others is so much more enjoyable. We can do so much more together to get our voice heard – much more than when we work alone. Our voices together have a much greater impact on society; it is a better way to spread our message.

I often meet people who think we young people cannot make a change, just because of our age! But now, I think our voices have really been heard and we have been able to convince people that the opposite is true.

Pauline: I am trying to represent the views and the concerns of the indigenous people. I am a lonely voice for them. It’s my belief that many people don’t understand the desperate needs of indigenous people worldwide. We had 500 years of colonisation in the Americas, 250 years of colonisation in Australia and 175 without sovereignty of New Zealand. So, where do we start and where do we finish? The indigenous peoples are not asking for much although they have lost their lands, rivers and forest – which is still happening today, for example in the Amazon. So while colonisation is still continuing in this day and age, where is the public in the world looking at?

But there are some positive developments. We had no fish in our river, we had nothing. Still, the local people made an agreement with the government department of conservation and since then, they have been working together to fence off our fish. Now, even visitors want to walk up there to see it.

Indigenous people still have the knowledge, still have their way of doing things. Many of us grew up with a basic understanding of the water, the sky, the storms and the sunshine. Sometimes I feel very sad that many people don’t understand that, don’t see that. We have a lot to offer.

The Transformative Power of Justice: can justice prevail over power?

To mark Human Rights Day, the World Future Council and the Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights are co-organizing a special event on December 8th, focusing on the “Transformative Power of Justice”.

8th December 2016 / 12:30 - 14:15

Library Events Room (B-135) Palais des Nations, Building B, Door 20, 1st floor

Through a combination of diplomatic and political expertise as well as a dynamic performance, multi-media presentation, and an interactive dialogue, the event will address some thorny questions: can justice prevail over power? Can humanity survive brutality? Can right overcome might? And, most importantly, can the human rights agenda be strengthened and not circumvented during turbulent transitions?

Eminent guest speakers confirmed their presence for the high-level round table that will be moderated by World Future Councillor Dr. Rama Mani and that will provide diverse perspectives on human rights challenges and transformative justice applications in times of volatile transition:

  • H.E. Ambassador Suraya Dalil, Permanent Representative of Afghanistan
  • H.E. Ambassador Beatriz Londoño, Permanent Representative of Colombia
  • H.E. Ambassador Andreas Ignatiou, Permanent Representative of Cyprus
  • Mr. Adam Abdelmoula, Director of Human Rights Council and Treaty Bodies Mechanisms Division, OHCHR

Moreover, a lively theatrical performance by Dr. Rama Mani, who is also Director of the Geneva Academy’s MA course on Transformative Justice, will vividly portray real cases of transformative justice, accompanied by renowned musician Mr. Paul Grant and by MA course participants hailing from transitional societies and diverse countries.

Held at the United Nations Office in Geneva from 12:30 to 2:15pm, the event and reception are kindly co-hosted by the Permanent Mission of Afghanistan and Permanent Mission of Cyprus to the United Nations Office in Geneva.

Invitees not in possession of a UN badge should register on the UNOG website at www.unog.ch/librarytalks, bring a valid ID and a copy of this invitation on the day of the event to the Pregny Gate, located at 8-14 Avenue de la Paix, 1211 Geneva 10.

Summer news in August!

Dear friends,

As Martin Luther King once said, “it may be true that laws can’t change the heart but they can restrain the heartless”. Only good laws have the power to guarantee people’s fundamental rights and ensure that future generations grow up in just societies and a healthy environment.

We are excited to present some of these exemplary policies in our new “Future Policy” video series. And don’t forget to follow us on social media to stay up-to-date on our work.

With best wishes,

Jakob von Uexkull (Founder),
Alexandra Wandel (Director) and
Stefan Schurig (Member Management Board)
Support our work by donating

New Zealand’s Whanganui River Deed of Settlement

Under this settlement, following a Māori belief, the Whanganui River in New Zealand is recognised as a legal person, granting it rights, powers, duties and liabilities. Read more about this groundbreaking policy.
Synergies between Better Public Spaces and Regenerative Cities

Public space regeneration not only allows greener cities but can also lead to a revitalisation of urban communities, inclusiveness and social equality. Together with UN-HABITAT we explored the linkages between public spaces and the regenerative city from July 25-27.

The Brexit Chaos

Theresa May has vowed to make a success of Brexit. But will the British Parliament actually pass Brexit legislation, which most of its members do not believe in? The current House of Commons has a large pro-EU majority and it is unlikely that this will change after the next election. Read Jakob von Uexkull’s reflections on the matter.
Support our work by donating
Great news from Maryland, USA! The sewage pollution goals have been met 10 years early, there has been a resurgence in flora and fauna and “dead zones” in the Chesapeake Bay are shrinking. Maryland’s strong environmental education legislation, which won our Future Policy Award 2015, plays a key role in these developments.
Read more
Renewable energy and poverty reduction in Tanzania

Dar es Salaam, Tanzania: policy-makers and WFC staff together for 100% RE
How do we make 100% Renewable Energy a reality in Tanzania? Only by working together! This is why 40 policy-makers and opinion leaders established a new task force as the result of our workshop in Dar es Salaam this July. The exciting collaboration inspires stakeholders and builds up hands-on knowledge on how 100% RE adds value to local economic development and community sustainability.
Read more
How terminology skewed the Trident debate
George Orwell famously wrote in his novel 1984 that, “if thought corrupts language, language can also corrupt thought”. Some of the terms used in the debate on the renewal of the Trident nuclear programme in the UK are inaccurate or misleading. Instead of describing the systems and policies that rely on nuclear weapons in terms of “deterrent” and “strategic stability”, we should expose the risks they are rife with and underline the catastrophic consequences any use would have.
Read more
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World Future Council Newsletter – August 2016
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Dear friends,

As Martin Luther King once said, “it may be true that laws can’t change the heart but they can restrain the heartless”. Only good laws have the power to guarantee people’s fundamental rights and ensure that future generations grow up in just societies and a healthy environment.

We are excited to present some of these exemplary policies in our new “Future Policy” video series. And don’t forget to follow us on social media to stay up-to-date on our work.

With best wishes,

Jakob von Uexkull (Founder),
Alexandra Wandel (Director) and
Stefan Schurig (Member Management Board)
Support our work by donating

New Zealand’s Whanganui River Deed of Settlement

Under this settlement, following a Māori belief, the Whanganui River in New Zealand is recognised as a legal person, granting it rights, powers, duties and liabilities. Read more about this groundbreaking policy.
Synergies between Better Public Spaces and Regenerative Cities

Public space regeneration not only allows greener cities but can also lead to a revitalisation of urban communities, inclusiveness and social equality. Together with UN-HABITAT we explored the linkages between public spaces and the regenerative city from July 25-27.

The Brexit Chaos

Theresa May has vowed to make a success of Brexit. But will the British Parliament actually pass Brexit legislation, which most of its members do not believe in? The current House of Commons has a large pro-EU majority and it is unlikely that this will change after the next election. Read Jakob von Uexkull’s reflections on the matter.
Support our work by donating
News
Watch and learn: Renewable Energy in 15 minutes
Future Policy Series – 100% Renewable Energy
Click the picture above to watch the first episode of our brand new “Future Policy Series”.
What are 100% Renewable Energy Targets and what impact can they have on communities across the world? In the first episode of our new “Future Policy Series”, our Senior Project Manager Anna Leidreiter answers these and other questions in a short video presentation.
Watch the video
Environmental education and local action lead to impressive impacts in Maryland

Maryland, US: Children learning in the outdoors
Great news from Maryland, US! The sewage pollution goals have been met 10 years early, there has been a resurgence in flora and fauna and “dead zones” in the Chesapeake Bay are shrinking. Maryland’s strong environmental education legislation, which won our Future Policy Award 2015, plays a key role in these developments.
Read more
Renewable energy and poverty reduction in Tanzania

Dar es Salaam, Tanzania: policy-makers and WFC staff together for 100% RE
How do we make 100% Renewable Energy a reality in Tanzania? Only by working together! This is why 40 policy-makers and opinion leaders established a new task force as the result of our workshop in Dar es Salaam this July. The exciting collaboration inspires stakeholders and builds up hands-on knowledge on how 100% RE adds value to local economic development and community sustainability.
Read more
How terminology skewed the Trident debate
George Orwell famously wrote in his novel 1984 that, “if thought corrupts language, language can also corrupt thought”. Some of the terms used in the debate on the renewal of the Trident nuclear programme in the UK are inaccurate or misleading. Instead of describing the systems and policies that rely on nuclear weapons in terms of “deterrent” and “strategic stability”, we should expose the risks they are rife with and underline the catastrophic consequences any use would have.
Read more
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About this newsletter
The World Future Council newsletter appears monthly. Please activate the function “picture download” in your email programme and add our sender address to the trustworthy addresses in your address book so that our newsletter will not be categorized as spam.
Copyright © 2016 World Future Council, All rights reserved.
You are receiving this newsletter because you are interested in future just policies.

Our mailing address is:
World Future Council
Lilienstraße 5-9
Hamburg 20095
Germany

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Summer update from the WFC!

 

 

World Future Council Newsletter – July 2016
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Dear friends,
Across the world people are discussing the consequences of the UK vote to leave the European Union and growing fears of a societal divide. As a foundation that spreads positive solutions to unite and promote peace between countries, we believe there is still much more that connects people than what divides them.

So, in these trying times, let us look forward, keep calm and carry on! Our recent activities prove that positive change can be achieved when we work together. You can read more about our thinking on the Brexit below.

With best wishes from London and Hamburg,

Jakob von Uexkull(Founder),
Alexandra Wandel(Director) and
Stefan Schurig (Member Management Board)

Support our work by donating
Paraguay’s National Contraceptive Services Committee

As July 11 marks World Population Day, we take a closer look atParaguay’s National Contraceptive Services Committee, which aims to increase the access, use and understanding of contraception to empower women and girls throughout Paraguay.

On June 6, our Councillor Thais Corral stopped by for a visit at our Hamburg office. Click on the picture to see a short video of her explaining why environmental education is so important for our children.

Revive the GermanEnergiewende
The latest changes to the German renewable energy law will result in significant job losses and a decline in business opportunities for entrepreneurs. But there is hope.
What Does Brexit Mean for the Environment?
The unthinkable has become a reality: The United Kingdom voted to leave the European Union. After the first shock, many questions remain. Some of them concern the energy policy and coordinated action against climate change in the UK and EU, as the effects on these crucial sectors are still uncertain. Read more.
100% RE and Poverty Reduction in Tanzania
How can Tanzania tackle poverty by moving towards 100% Renewable Energy? Together with CAN-Tanzania and Bread for the World we are developing a coherent strategy on how to implement 100% RE in Tanzania. Check out ournew report on how to facilitate the deployment of renewable energy in the country.
Support our work by donating
News
Policy Change in Practice: Oxford County in Canada adopts 100% Renewable Energy
Click to watch our Senior Programme Manager Anna Leidreiter talk about the benefits of renewable energy.
Oxford County in Canada has released a strategy for shifting to 100% Renewable Energy by 2050! We are thrilled to have supported them along the way, together with our partners from the Global 100% RE campaign. Click below to read a new article by our Senior Programme Manager Anna Leidreiter explaining why renewable energy is so beneficial for a community like Oxford County.
Read more
Event: Ending Violence Against Women and Girls
On June 21, together with the Permanent mission of Ecuador to the United Nations and the Inter-Parliamentary Union, we co-organized a working breakfast on ending violence against women and girls in Geneva. Our Councillors Maria Fernanda Espinosa and Dr. Rama Mani, our Director Alexandra Wandel, the Head of UN Women Ecuador Moni Pizani and our Policy Officer Marta Sanchez Dionis took part in the productive exchange.
Read more about our work
Can we make national and local governments work better together?
Image: blvdone/Shutterstock.com
National, regional and local governments have to work together closely if they want their cities to become more sustainable. How can we support these necessary partnerships? The Director of our Climate, Energy and Cities team and Management Board Member Stefan Schurig has an answer to this question: Building political will is one of the main challenges to ensure productive cooperation between stakeholders.
Read more
Two Women, One Mission: Pauline Tangiora and Kehkashan Basu in Interview
Kehkashan Basu and Pauline Tangiora
During our World Future Forum in March, WFC Councillor Pauline Tangiora and our Youth Ambassador Kehkashan Basu talked to us about their lives, their work and their hopes for the WFC.
Read more
Third Media Salon in Beijing
Participants in Beijing discussing land desertification
Land desertification deteriorates ecology and environment, harmfully impacting the sustainable development of China. On June 16, our Media Salon in Beijing discussed solutions to the issue. With a keynote speech by our Councillor Monique Barbut and more than 300 participants, the 3rd edition of the event was a full success.
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About this newsletter
The World Future Council newsletter appears monthly. Please activate the function “picture download” in your email programme and add our sender address to the trustworthy addresses in your address book so that our newsletter will not be categorized as spam.
Copyright © 2016 World Future Council, All rights reserved.
You are receiving this newsletter because you are interested in future just policies.Our mailing address is:

World Future Council

Lilienstraße 5-9

Hamburg 20095

Germany

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Early Summer update from the WFC!

Dear friends, 

With summer in our step, we look back on an exciting and eventful month. From witnessing environmental education in action and working to create a world without nuclear weapons to educating policy-makers on effective responses to domestic violence and making the case for ‘community energy’ – this edition of our newsletter fills you in on our recent activities.

And please don’t forget: our work is only made possible through the generosity of you, our supporters.  Help us to continue our work by supporting us with a donation!

With best wishes,

Jakob von Uexkull(Founder),
Alexandra Wandel(Director) and
Stefan Schurig (Member Management Board)

Rwanda’s National Forest Policy

Rwanda is one of only three countries in Central and Western Africa to achieve a major reversal in the trend of declining forest cover. Through its Future Policy Award-winning National Forest Policy, the country is on course to reach its goal of increasing forest cover to 30% of total land area by 2020.
Together with other international organisations and leading figures working to consider the welfare of future generations, we are meeting in Helsinki for high-level debate and exchange. The event will include a meeting of the Roundtable of Institutions for a Sustainable Future which the WFC helped to establish.
What are the two principal threats to the survival of humanity and how are they connected? Watchthis short video to find out.
“You can transition to 100% renewable energy in many different ways, but how is it done to meet the needs of the people and to reach sustainability?”WFC Climate & Energy expert Anna Leidreiter in conversation withRenewable Cities.

We need a new type of urbanization: Our reportexplains the way forward for China’s urban areas.

Fostering the next generation of environmental stewards: Learning the Maryland way
The ability of young people to make informed decisions about their relationship to nature has profound implications for both the local and global environment and our collective wellbeing. In 2011, the US state of Maryland became the first jurisdiction in the world to make environmental literacy a high school graduation requirement. For this, it won the 2015 Silver Future Policy Award. In May, our Children’s Rights team undertook a ten day field trip across the state to witness environmental literacy in action.
This week, REN21 published the most comprehensive annual overview of the state of renewable energy – the Renewables 2016 Global Status Report. Local governments, communities and citizens are the real pioneers of the transition towards 100% renewable energy. We contributed a chapter on community energy, sharing the WFC experiences from across the world. But what does ‘community energy’ actually mean? Click below to find out.
Global support and political will for nuclear disarmament
The Open Ended Working Group (OEWG) aims to address the concrete effective legal measures, legal provisions and norms necessary to create a world without nuclear weapons. On May 12, our Councillor Alyn Wareand Disarmament Coordinator Rob van Riet joined its latest meeting in Geneva. They were also part of a discussion with Michael Douglas and UN High-Level Rep Mr. Kim Won-soo on moving nuclear disarmament forward.
Coordinated Community Response to Domestic Violence: A workshop in Minnesota 
 

Recent data shows that at least 30% of women worldwide have suffered physical and/or sexual intimate partner violence. The “Coordinated Community Response (CCR) to Domestic Violence”, implemented in Minnesota (USA), has been successfully protecting women from domestic violence for more than 30 years. It won the 2014 Future Policy Award as the world’s best policy to address domestic violence. We recently visited Duluth to facilitate a workshop to spread the approach to other communities.

 

Honorary Councillor and Founding President of the Seychelles, Sir James Mancham, in Hamburg

 

WFC Honorary Councillor and Founding President of the Seychelles‬ Sir James Mancham visited our headquarters in Hamburg before heading off to several other European cities to participate in various peace-orientated forums.

May update from the WFC!

Dear friends,

Although we are still at the beginning of 2016, it has already been a special year for us. With our successful Word Future Forum, the visit of a former Prime Minister and so many other great projects and events, it was hard to pick the highlights for our newsletter. We hope you find this issue as exciting as we do!

Follow us on Twitter or Facebook and don’t forget to visit our new homepage.

With best wishes from Hamburg,

Jakob von Uexkull (Founder),
Alexandra Wandel (Director) and
Stefan Schurig (Member Management Board)

 

Policy of the month

It might be hard to believe today, but until 1979, no country explicitly prohibited all forms of corporal punishment of children. It was Sweden that decided to take action.Its pioneering reform is considered to have achieved full prohibition in all settings, including the home, and has fostered a profound change of attitude across Swedish society in relation to violence against children.

 

Zero Project Conference

More than 500 innovators from more than 70 countries came together for our Zero Project Conference 2016, highlighting the best policies and practices to provide access to education for persons with disabilities. Read more on our Zero Project website.

 

100 % RE goes Tanzania

How can 100% Renewable Energy work in Tanzania? We co-hosted a workshop in Dar es Salaam to kick off an 18-months project exploring the chances and challenges, bringing together 25 Tanzanian thought-leaders. Click here to read more!

 

The Guardian

The international community has agreed on an ambitious agenda to curb climate change. The question we now face is: how are we going to finance the changes needed to reach this goal? WFC Researcher Matthias Kroll suggests a way forward in his article.

 

Protecting refugee women and children

On the occasion of the International Women’s Day on March 8, members of the World Future Council called governments,international organizations, humanitarian actors and civil society to step up action to protect refugee women, children and unaccompanied minors from violence. Their powerful joint statement was signed at our World Future Forum 2016 in Hamburg.

 

World Future Forum 2016 in Hamburg

WFC Councillors and staff at the World Future Forum 2016.
More than 50 Councillors, Ambassadors, Staff and Board Members came together at our Annual General Meeting to share their views of the future and discuss ways to achieve a peaceful, sustainable and just future. “History has knocked very loudly on our door. Will we answer?”, asked our founder Jakob von Uexkull in his inspiring opening speech.
Read more
Our brand new website is online!

We relaunched our website and are very excited to introduce you to our ‘new look’. We hope that the new design and features will spark many conversations with all of you. Check it out and let us know what you think!
Start exploring
Marshall Islands’ nuclear disarmament cases

Oral hearings on the preliminary phase of the nuclear disarmament cases brought by the Marshall Islands against India, Pakistan and the United Kingdom took place at the International Court of Justice in The Hague from 7-16 March. Members of the World Future Council have been involved in this unprecedented legal action since its launch in 2014 and some were present during the oral arguments at the Court. For a short and informative video about the case, featuring our Disarmament Programme Coordinator Rob van Riet, click here.
More information about the ICJ cases
Five years after Fukushima: Former Japanese Prime Minister visits WFC office

“The age of nuclear and fossil fuel is over”. On March 23, former Japanese PM Naoto Kan, our founder Jakob von Uexkull and German Entrepreneur and Honorary WFC Councillor Dr. Michael Otto discussed energy politics in Japan and Germany – five years after Fukushima. The outcome? Renewable energy is the only way forward!
More on the Fukushima Anniversary
Why do we need a UN High Commissioner for Future Generations?
Why do we need a UN High Commissioner for Future Generations?
Decisions taken by politicians today will have a major influence on the world of tomorrow and drastically impact the well-being of future generations. But although they undeniably face the consequences of what is decided today, future generations don’t have a pre-emptive say in it. Our new video shows how this can be changed.

Spring update from the WFC!

Dear friends,

Although we are still at the beginning of 2016, it has already been a special year for us. With our successful Word Future Forum, the visit of a former Prime Minister and so many other great projects and events, it was hard to pick the highlights for our newsletter. We hope you find this issue as exciting as we do!

Follow us on Twitter or Facebook and don’t forget to visit our new homepage.

With best wishes from Hamburg,

Jakob von Uexkull (Founder),
Alexandra Wandel (Director) and
Stefan Schurig (Member Management Board)

 

Policy of the month

It might be hard to believe today, but until 1979, no country explicitly prohibited all forms of corporal punishment of children. It was Sweden that decided to take action.Its pioneering reform is considered to have achieved full prohibition in all settings, including the home, and has fostered a profound change of attitude across Swedish society in relation to violence against children.

 

Zero Project Conference

More than 500 innovators from more than 70 countries came together for our Zero Project Conference 2016, highlighting the best policies and practices to provide access to education for persons with disabilities. Read more on our Zero Project website.

 

100 % RE goes Tanzania

How can 100% Renewable Energy work in Tanzania? We co-hosted a workshop in Dar es Salaam to kick off an 18-months project exploring the chances and challenges, bringing together 25 Tanzanian thought-leaders. Click here to read more!

 

The Guardian

The international community has agreed on an ambitious agenda to curb climate change. The question we now face is: how are we going to finance the changes needed to reach this goal? WFC Researcher Matthias Kroll suggests a way forward in his article.

 

Protecting refugee women and children

On the occasion of the International Women’s Day on March 8, members of the World Future Council called governments,international organizations, humanitarian actors and civil society to step up action to protect refugee women, children and unaccompanied minors from violence. Their powerful joint statement was signed at our World Future Forum 2016 in Hamburg.

 

World Future Forum 2016 in Hamburg

WFC Councillors and staff at the World Future Forum 2016.
More than 50 Councillors, Ambassadors, Staff and Board Members came together at our Annual General Meeting to share their views of the future and discuss ways to achieve a peaceful, sustainable and just future. “History has knocked very loudly on our door. Will we answer?”, asked our founder Jakob von Uexkull in his inspiring opening speech.
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Our brand new website is online!

We relaunched our website and are very excited to introduce you to our ‘new look’. We hope that the new design and features will spark many conversations with all of you. Check it out and let us know what you think!
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Marshall Islands’ nuclear disarmament cases

Oral hearings on the preliminary phase of the nuclear disarmament cases brought by the Marshall Islands against India, Pakistan and the United Kingdom took place at the International Court of Justice in The Hague from 7-16 March. Members of the World Future Council have been involved in this unprecedented legal action since its launch in 2014 and some were present during the oral arguments at the Court. For a short and informative video about the case, featuring our Disarmament Programme Coordinator Rob van Riet, click here.
More information about the ICJ cases
Five years after Fukushima: Former Japanese Prime Minister visits WFC office

“The age of nuclear and fossil fuel is over”. On March 23, former Japanese PM Naoto Kan, our founder Jakob von Uexkull and German Entrepreneur and Honorary WFC Councillor Dr. Michael Otto discussed energy politics in Japan and Germany – five years after Fukushima. The outcome? Renewable energy is the only way forward!
More on the Fukushima Anniversary
Why do we need a UN High Commissioner for Future Generations?
Why do we need a UN High Commissioner for Future Generations?
Decisions taken by politicians today will have a major influence on the world of tomorrow and drastically impact the well-being of future generations. But although they undeniably face the consequences of what is decided today, future generations don’t have a pre-emptive say in it. Our new video shows how this can be changed.