WFC Summer News

NEWS FROM THE WFC IN AUGUST
Dear Friends & Supporters,

Land degradation costs more lives than any other environmental disaster. If we don’t stop the trend of desertification, hundreds of millions of people will be forced to leave their homes in the next decades. The Future Policy Award turns a spotlight on this challenge - and honours effective responses. The winners of this year's FPA have been announced recently.

People of Tigray (Ethiopia) turn the desert into green land again, China reversed the trend of desertification and led millions of people out of poverty - and there are more inspiring success stories to tell with the Future Policy Award 2017!
Jakob von Uexkull, Alexandra Wandel & Stefan Schurig
The Management Board

FUTURE POLICY AWARD 2017: ETHIOPIA WINS GOLD (https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/p/2017-desertification/)

It is estimated that 135 million people are at risk of being displaced by desertification, and drylands are the most conflict-prone regions of the world. Climate change, and the increasingly unpredictable and extreme weather in arid lands, makes combating desertification even more vital. With this year’s Future Policy Award, we honour effective policies that combat desertification - Ethiopia’s Tigray Region wins Gold.
READ MORE (https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/p/2017-desertification/) https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/ibrahim-abouleish-passed-away/

LEARNING TO BUILD A BETTER FUTURE: THE SCOTTISH WAY (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/learning-to-build-a-better-future-the-scottish-way_us_59943845e4b0afd94eb3f64d)
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/learning-to-build-a-better-future-the-scottish-way_us_59943845e4b0afd94eb3f64d
Building sustainable, low-carbon societies starts with education: In Scotland, this is not lip service, but the heart of Scotland’s emerging pedagogy. The World Future Council has joined Education Scotland to see “Learning for Sustainability” in action. Find out more in Jakob von Uexkull's latest HuffPost Article
READ ARTICLE (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/learning-to-build-a-better-future-the-scottish-way_us_59943845e4b0afd94eb3f64d)

CHARITY CONCERT IN BERLIN (https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/wfc-charity-concert-berlin-2017/)

On Monday, 4 September 2017, a charity concert will take place in the Kammermusiksaal of the Berliner Philharmonie in order to support the World Future Council. Jakob von Uexkull, Founder of the WFC, will hold the welcome speech.
GET TICKETS (https://www.berlinerfestspiele.de/de/aktuell/festivals/musikfest_berlin/programm_mfb/mfb17_programm_gesamt/mfb17_veranstaltungsdetail_201821.php)

POLICY OF THE MONTH: TIGRAY'S LAND RESTORATION (http://www.futurepolicy.org/healthy-ecosystems/biodiversity-and-soil/tigrays-conservation-based-adli/)
http://www.futurepolicy.org/healthy-ecosystems/biodiversity-and-soil/tigrays-conservation-based-adli/
Tigray’s people are turning desert into green land again: The Ethiopian region is restoring its degraded lands and improving its food and water security. A well-deserved Future Policy Gold Award 2017!
READ MORE (http://www.futurepolicy.org/healthy-ecosystems/biodiversity-and-soil/tigrays-conservation-based-adli/)
RECOMMENDED ARTICLE: 100% RENEWABLES FOR BANGLADESH (http://www.dhakatribune.com/tribune-supplements/tribune-climate/2017/08/12/bangladesh-towards-100-renewable-energy/)
http://www.dhakatribune.com/tribune-supplements/tribune-climate/2017/08/12/bangladesh-towards-100-renewable-energy/
Bangladesh is starving for energy. A 100% Renewable Energy strategy could provide enough clean energy for everyone in this sunny but pollution-prone country. ByWFC-Councillor Dipal Chandra Barua
READ ARTICLE (http://www.dhakatribune.com/tribune-supplements/tribune-climate/2017/08/12/bangladesh-towards-100-renewable-energy/)

EXPLORE OUR PUBLICATIONS (https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/media-room/publications/)

An increasing number of refugees worldwide are women and children. How can we better protect these women and girls from violence? This report highlights some exemplary practices and initiatives.
Read more (https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/protecting-refugee-women-and-girls-from-violence/)

The military-industrial complex is using their power to make governments maintain high military spending. This study presents ideas on how decision-makers can be convinced to use this budget to fund sustainable programmes instead.
Read more (https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/move-nuclear-weapons-money/)

3 billion people worldwide rely on traditional biomass fuels. Deforestation, soil erosion and loss of biodiversity are the devastating results. This report evaluates the various technological pathways – and the barriers – leading towards sustainable solutions.
Read more (https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/beyond-fire-achieve-sustainable-cooking/)

Want to make a difference in 2017?
Become a WFC Supporter!
We give a voice to future generations and stand up for their rights by providing policy tools to empower millions of people around the world. Become a supporter to make the world a more sustainable place.
MORE INFORMATION (https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/supporter/)

Climate Action – even without the US!

The F20 Platform is looking back to a successful event in Hamburg

The F20 Foundations Platform is an alliance of more than 45 foundations and philanthropic organizations from twelve countries that have joined forces in order to further shape the political discourse on future sustainability measures.

Ahead of the G20 summit in Hamburg, representatives from participating foundations got together to discuss the challenges and opportunities of the implementation of the Paris Agreement. In a joint statement, they called upon the G20 states to confirm their commitment to the Paris Agreement.

 

 

During the event in the prestigious Hamburg Town Hall, which was mainly organised by the World Future Council, WFC-Councillor Dr. Auma Obama and Honorary Councillor Dr. Michael Otto took part in the press conference. Dr. Otto emphasised the importance of the implementation of the Paris Agreement and urged for more ambitious climate action, also in Germany: He pressed for a German withdrawal from fossile fuel and the promotion of renewable energies and carbon-neutral traffic.

During her speech at the event, Dr. Obama stressed that African people must be included when talking about climate action: They should not be doing the same mistakes as the industrialised countries, and would be able to leapfrog developments. Other speakers included Laurence Tubiana, the architect behind the Paris Agreement, the US-american physicist and environmentalist Amory B. Lovins, as well as the British economist Lord Nicholas Stern. Around 400 people attended the event; the side-events before and after the main event included an energy transition tour through Hamburg and other workshops organised by F20 foundations.

Dr. Michael Otto and Dr. Auma Obama during the F20 press conference. Photo Credits: Jochen Quast | www.jochenquast.de | www.con-text.de

 

At the end of the main event in Hamburg, the German minister for the environment, Barbara Hendricks, received the F20 publication. Climate action and sustainable development must become core duties of the leading industrialised and threshold countries. The Trump Administration’s withdrawal from the Paris Agreement is “short sighted and irresponsible”, as the F20 members state. We are positive that the event on the 4th of July here in Hamburg was just the start of a success story for common and transnational action towards a zero carbon economy and a successful implementation of the 2030 Agenda.

For more information on the F20 Platform, please visit www.foundations-20.org

 

WFC News this July

https://www.facebook.com/wfc.goodpolicies https://twitter.com/Good_Policies https://www.linkedin.com/company/world-future-council



NEWSLETTER
JULY 2017
Donate Now (https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/donate/)

NEWS FROM THE WFC THIS JULY
Dear Friends & Supporters,

This July, the city of Hamburg was shaken by the G20 summit. But regardless of the tale that international media told about a city out of control, tens of thousands of people stood up in peaceful and colourful protest for a more just and sustainable world. The values that the World Future Council promotes are today more relevant than ever! With the F20 Event on 4th of July, over 45 foundations including the WFC took a stand for more ambitious climate action and prove that there are solutions to the problems we face.
Jakob von Uexkull, Alexandra Wandel & Stefan Schurig
The Management Board

FOUNDATIONS TAKE A STAND FOR CLIMATE ACTION (https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/f20-event-hamburg-2017/)

With 400 invited guests attending and an excellent speaker panel, the F20 Foundations Platform can look back on a very successful F20 Event in Hamburg. Their publication "Renewable Energy, Climate Action and Resilient Societies: Accelerating the Global and Local Paradigm Shift" has been handed over to the German Minister for the environment, Barbara Hendricks.
READ ARTICLE (https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/f20-event-hamburg-2017/)

FUTURE POLICY AWARD 2017: SHORTLIST PUBLISHED (https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/p/2017-desertification/)

Desertification is one of humankind’s greatest challenges: land degradation and drought are increasing with climate change, and claim more lives than any other environmental disaster. This year’s Future Policy Award celebrates laws and measures that successfully combat desertification. The shortlist has now been published.
READ MORE (https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/p/2017-desertification/) https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/ibrahim-abouleish-passed-away/

CHARITY CONCERT IN BERLIN (https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/wfc-charity-concert-berlin-2017/)

On Monday, 4 September 2017, a charity concert will take place in the Kammermusiksaal of the Berliner Philharmonie in order to support the World Future Council. Jakob von Uexkull, Founder of the WFC, will hold the welcome speech.
FIND OUT MORE (https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/wfc-charity-concert-berlin-2017/)

POLICY OF THE MONTH: ZERO WASTE, SCOTLAND
http://www.futurepolicy.org/enterprise-and-design/consumption/zerowastescotland/%20
Unutilised waste does not only produce pollution, but also costs the taxpayer money. Scotland implemented their Zero Waste Plan in 2010, and constitutes a roadmap for a progressive waste reduction, disposal and recycling strategy.
READ MORE (http://www.futurepolicy.org/enterprise-and-design/consumption/zerowastescotland/%20)
RECOMMENDED ARTICLE: WHY WAR CONTINUES
http://www.resurgence.org/magazine/article4867-working-for-a-world-without-war.html?utm_source=Scilla+Elworthy%27s+UK+Contacts&utm_campaign=34c862e546-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2017_05_18&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_80248fb630-34c862e546-241112581
We must overhaul the assumption that “defence” brings security, reckons Scilla Elworthy in her latest article. The WFC Councillor reflects why war continues, and how peace can be built.
READ ARTICLE (http://www.resurgence.org/magazine/article4867-working-for-a-world-without-war.html?utm_source=Scilla+Elworthy%27s+UK+Contacts&utm_campaign=34c862e546-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2017_05_18&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_80248fb630-34c862e546-241112581)

BROWSE OUR PUBLICATIONS

Our latest Annual Report China is looking back to our second year in China and to our Regenerative Cities programme: 2016 was a year of successes and challenges during a sustainable urbanization reform.
Read more (https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/china-annual-report-2016/)

Financial institutions and governments are keen to stress that regulation should not unnecessarily burden the financial sector. How can the public interest be effectively protected and strengthened?
Read more (https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/financial-market-reform-strengthening-public-interest/)

How can climate vulnerable countries scale up the transition to 100% RE while eradicating poverty? This report suggests concrete political measures, experiences and recommendations by Tanzanian stakeholders.
Read more (https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/roadmap-100-re-poverty-eradication-tanzania/)

Want to make a difference in 2017?
Become a WFC Supporter!
We give a voice to future generations and stand up for their rights by providing policy tools to empower millions of people around the world. Become a supporter to make the world a more sustainable place.
MORE INFORMATION (https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/supporter/)

Contact us
World Future Council
Lilienstraße 5-9 Hamburg
20095 Germany
info@worldfuturecouncil.org (mailto:info@worldfuturecouncil.org)
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World Future Council awards international prize for best policies to combat desertification in China

Hamburg / Bonn / Ordos, 22nd August 2017: More people, less erosion – Ethiopia’s Tigray region demonstrates that this can be a reality: They will take home the Gold Future Policy Award 2017, beating 26 other nominated policies to the prize.

Future Policy Award crowns the World’s Best Land Restoration Policies

Ethiopia wins Gold Award │ Other winning policies from China, Brazil and Jordan

Hamburg / Bonn / Ordos, 22nd August 2017: More people, less erosion – Ethiopia’s Tigray region demonstrates that this can be a reality: They will take home the Gold Future Policy Award 2017, beating 26 other nominated policies to the prize. Also known as “Oscar for Best Policies”, the Future Policy Award highlights the world’s best policies that combat desertification and land degradation this year. With unique collective action, voluntary labour and the involvement of youth, the people of Tigray are restoring land on a massive scale. As a result, erosion has decreased significantly, groundwater levels are recharged, and the uptake of sustainable agricultural practices made a significant contribution to food self-sufficiency and economic growth.

Read in other languages

Photo by TerrAfrica Partnership at NEPAD Agency

Two Silver Awards were granted to:

  • Brazil’s Cistern Programme, which empowered millions of the country’s poorest people by building 2 million cisterns in the Semiarid region and providing water for consumption and for growing food and keeping livestock
  • China’s Law on Prevention and Control of Desertification, the world’s first integrated law dedicated to combating desertification. Over the last 15 years, China has reversed the trend of desertification.

The Vision Award goes to the international “4 per 1000” Initiative which communicates a new concept for mitigating climate change through the increase of soil organic carbon.

The international jury further bestowed Bronze Awards to:

  • Australia’s Indigenous Protected Areas and Rangers Programmes, where more than 2,600 indigenous rangers are at the forefront of tackling environmental degradation
  • Jordan’s Updated Rangeland Strategy, which is enshrining the Middle East’s most widespread and longstanding indigenous traditional conservation institution ‘Hima’ into law
  • Niger’s large-scale, cross-sectoral 3N Initiative ‘Nigeriens Nourishing Nigeriens’ addressing land degradation and food security.

Statements from the UNCCD and the World Future Council

Monique Barbut, Under-Secretary-General of the United Nations and Executive Secretary of the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD):

“Drylands cover close to 40% of the Earth’s land surface. Hundreds of millions of people are directly threatened by land degradation and climate change is only going to intensify the problem. So far, this underestimated environmental disaster has received far too little attention. The Future Policy Award 2017 is turning the spotlight on the looming environmental challenge and effective responses. The seven Future Policy Awardees are all from affected countries, and demonstrate great environmental and political determination.”

 Alexandra Wandel, Director of the World Future Council (WFC):

“The Ethiopian Tigray Region’s win of the Gold Future Policy Award is sending a strong, empowering message: they show how a small region in a climate vulnerable country can find a smart and highly effective way to successfully address a global challenge. This is placing Ethiopia firmly on the map as an environmental leader.”

The Future Policy Award is the only award which honours policies rather than people on an international level. Each year, the World Future Council chooses a topic for the Future Policy Award on which policy progress is particularly urgent. In 2017, in partnership with the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD), laws and policies were evaluated that contribute to the protection of life and livelihoods in the drylands, and help achieve Sustainable Development Goal 15, target 3, to “combat desertification, restore degraded land and soil, including land affected by desertification, drought and floods, and strive to achieve a land degradation-neutral world.” The Awards will be presented at a ceremony in September 2017, at the thirteenth session of the Conference of the Parties of the UNCCD in Ordos, China.

For more information, please visit
https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/future-policy-award/
https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/p/2017-desertification/
http://www.futurepolicy.org/

Follow the 2017 Future Policy Award on Twitter with #FPA2017

 

Media contact

Miriam Petersen
Media & Communications Manager
Tel: +49 40 307 09 14 19

miriam.petersen@worldfuturecouncil.org

Wagaki Wischenewsjki
Public Information and Media Officer
United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification
Tel: +49 228 815 2820
wwischnewski@unccd.int

The World Future Council

The World Future Council brings the interests of future generations to the centre of policy-making. Its up to 50 eminent members from around the globe have already successfully promoted change. The Council addresses challenges to our common future and provides decision makers with effective policy solutions. In close cooperation with civil society actors, parliamentarians, governments, business and international organizations the World Future Council identifies “best policies” around the globe. The World Future Council is registered as a charitable foundation in Hamburg, Germany.

The United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification

The United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD) is the only legally binding international agreement on land issues. The Convention promotes good land stewardship. Its 196 Parties aim, through partnerships, to implement the Convention and achieve the Sustainable Development Goals. The end goal is to protect our land, from over-use and drought, so it can continue to provide us all with food, water and energy. By sustainably managing land and striving to achieve land degradation neutrality, now and in the future, we will reduce the impact of climate change, avoid conflict over natural resources and help communities to thrive.

World’s best policies on land restoration shortlisted for Future Policy Award 2017

Hamburg/Bonn, 20 July 2017 – The 2017 Future Policy Award has released a shortlist of the world’s best policies for tackling land degradation, one of humanity’s foremost challenges that undermines food security, livelihoods and the health of hundreds of millions of people.

 

The six shortlisted policies are from Australia, Brazil, China, Ethiopia’s Tigray Region, Jordan, and Niger. The international 4 per 1000 initiative is also contending for the Future Policy Award.

The prestigious award, which focuses on a different area of policy progress each year, celebrates exemplary laws that create better living conditions for current and future generations.

For this year’s award, the World Future Council teamed up with the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD) to highlight laws and policies that contribute in two ways.

 

First, laws that protect of life and livelihoods in the drylands. Drylands cover close to 40 per cent of the Earth’s land and are extremely vulnerable to over-exploitation, inappropriate land use and climate variability. They are among the most conflict- and drought-prone regions of the world.

Droughts, which are getting more severe, frequent and widespread with climate change, are common in drylands, and can amplify tensions within and between communities. In the last century, droughts killed more people than any other weather-related catastrophe.

Second, laws that advance Sustainable Development Goal 15, target 3, which is to combat desertification, restore degraded land and soil, including land affected by desertification, drought and floods, and strive to achieve a land degradation-neutral world.

Political instability, deforestation, overgrazing and bad irrigation practices can all contribute to desertification. Without action to restore and rehabilitate degraded land, an estimated 135 million people are at risk of being displaced by desertification.

 

UNCCD’s Executive Secretary Monique Barbut describes desertification as “a silent, invisible crisis that is destabilizing communities on a global scale.”

 

In total, twenty-seven policies and initiatives from 18 countries were nominated. Shortlisted as the world’s best policies to combat desertification and land degradation are:

  • Australia: Indigenous Protected Areas programme and Working on Country Indigenous Rangers programme. Indigenous Rangers are at the forefront of tackling environmental degradation right across Australia. 75 Indigenous Protected Areas now make up more than 44 per cent of the National Reserve System and have created the world’s largest contiguous area of protected arid land.
  • Brazil: Cistern Programme and the National Programme to Support Rainwater Harvesting and Other Social Technologies for Access to Water. This programme is a participative, bottom-up way to provide water for consumption and for growing food and keeping livestock. It empowers millions of the poorest people in the region to be in control of their own needs, to generate income and enhance their food security.
  • China: Law of the People’s Republic of China on Prevention and Control of Desertification. This is the world’s first integrated law dedicated to combating desertification. It provides a framework for China’s National Action Programme and a host of projects aimed at rehabilitating at risk land. Over the last 15 years, China has reversed the trend of desertification. It is no coincidence that the country lifted more than 700 million people out of poverty during the same period.
  • Ethiopia’s Tigray Region: Conservation-Based Agricultural Development-Led Industrialization supported by Mass Mobilization Campaigns and the Youth Responsive Land Policy More people less erosion. The Tigray region’s interpretation of Ethiopia’s development strategy focusses on food self-sufficiency and economic growth by conserving land and promoting sustainable agriculture. With unique collective action, voluntary labour and the involvement of youth the people of Tigray are restoring land on a massive scale.
  • International: The 4 per 1000 Initiative: Soils for Food Security and Climate. This awareness raising, high-level political initiative communicates a new concept for mitigating climate change through the annual increase in soil organic carbon by 0.4 per cent in the top 30-40 cm of the agricultural soils. It encourages a paradigm shift in agricultural practice.
  • Jordan: Updated Rangeland Strategy for Jordan. Traditionally, Bedouin people in Jordan effectively govern their rangelands through their own land tenure systems and grazing rights known as “Hima”. The Rangeland Strategy embraces this holistic concept which integrates natural resources, community life, ethics, animal welfare and more.
  • Niger: 3N Initiative ‘Nigeriens Nourishing Nigeriens’ – Strategy for food security, nutrition, and sustainable agricultural development. The initiative is a large-scale and cross-sectoral policy enhancing sustainable agricultural development and socio-economic resilience of farmers and herders. It was developed in an inclusive and participatory process. Since 2011, Niger has reduced the number of people suffering from hunger by 50 per cent.

 

The winners will be announced on 22 August 2017. The award ceremony will take place during the Thirteen Session of the Conference of the Parties of UNCCD in Ordos, China, scheduled from 6-16 September 2017.

The Future Policy Award is unique in focusing global attention towards the most effective policies changing lives across the planet. The aim of the award is to raise global awareness for exemplary laws and policies.

The policy evaluation is based on the “Seven Principles for Future Just Lawmaking.” Consequently, policies score high not only by promoting the sustainable use of resources but also by addressing equity, eradication of poverty, participation, and peaceful resolution of conflicts.

For more information, please visit
https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/future-policy-award/
https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/p/2017-desertification/
http://www.futurepolicy.org/

 

 

Media contact

Miriam Petersen
Media & Communications Manager
Tel: +49 40 307 09 14 19

miriam.petersen@worldfuturecouncil.org

Wagaki Wischenewsjki
Public Information and Media Officer
United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification
Tel: +49 228 815 2820
wwischnewski@unccd.int

The World Future Council

The World Future Council brings the interests of future generations to the centre of policy-making. Its up to 50 eminent members from around the globe have already successfully promoted change. The Council addresses challenges to our common future and provides decision makers with effective policy solutions. In close cooperation with civil society actors, parliamentarians, governments, business and international organizations the World Future Council identifies “best policies” around the globe. The World Future Council is registered as a charitable foundation in Hamburg, Germany.

The United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification

The United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD) is the only legally binding international agreement on land issues. The Convention promotes good land stewardship. Its 196 Parties aim, through partnerships, to implement the Convention and achieve the Sustainable Development Goals. The end goal is to protect our land, from over-use and drought, so it can continue to provide us all with food, water and energy. By sustainably managing land and striving to achieve land degradation neutrality, now and in the future, we will reduce the impact of climate change, avoid conflict over natural resources and help communities to thrive.

News from the WFC in June!

https://www.facebook.com/wfc.goodpolicies https://twitter.com/Good_Policies https://www.linkedin.com/company/world-future-council


NEWSLETTER
JUNE 2017
Donate Now (https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/donate/)
NEWS FROM THE WFC THIS JUNE
Dear Friends & Supporters,

Saddening news reached us this month: Egypt’s Sustainable Development Trailblazer, Dr Ibrahim Abouleish passed away at the age of 80. We are deeply grateful for Ibrahim’s visionary, pioneering work for passing an ecological and peaceful planet to future generations. As founding member of the WFC, he made an outstanding contribution to our work and will be sorely missed.

------------------------------------------------------------
The US’ withdrawal from the Paris Agreement brought the importance of a united climate action back on the public agenda. But would the transition to 100% RE possibly require so much additional energy that it would thwart the reduction of CO2 emissions? Jakob von Uexkull proves in his recent article that the complete decarbonization of the energy system comes at a relatively low fossil fuel ‘cost’.

We hope you enjoy this month's newsletter!
With best wishes from all at the World Future Council
Jakob von Uexkull, Alexandra Wandel & Stefan Schurig
The Management Board
THE CLIMATE COST OF 100% RENEWABLE ENERGY
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/the-climate-cost-of-100-renewable-energy_us_59366c58e4b0c670a3ce6806
Even after the U.S. having announced to leave the Paris Agreement, the rest of the world seems to be committed to proceed to fight CO2 emissions and to foster the transition to 100% Renewable Energies. While this transition will ultimately lead to a fully decarbonized energy system, some fossil fuel based energy needs to be invested to actually build it. So, how much fossil fuels are needed to build a CO2 free energy system? Read Jakob von Uexkull's latest HuffPost (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/the-climate-cost-of-100-renewable-energy_us_59366c58e4b0c670a3ce6806) article.
READ ARTICLE (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/the-climate-cost-of-100-renewable-energy_us_59366c58e4b0c670a3ce6806)
MOURNING IBRAHIM ABOULEISH

A great loss: WFC founding member Dr Ibrahim Abouleish passed away on 15 June. Dr Abouleish, founder of SEKEM, received the ‘Alternative Nobel Prize’ in 2003 for implementing an innovative business model which combines commercial success with social and cultural development.
https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/world-future-forum-10th-annual-meeting-world-future-council-bregenz/https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/bregenz-declaration-call-collective-consciousness/READ MORE (https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/ibrahim-abouleish-passed-away/)
UPDATES ON THE F20 PLATFORM (http://www.foundations-20.org/news.html)
http://www.foundations-20.org/news.html
• • • The F20 network is growing rapidly (http://www.foundations-20.org/partner.html) with now more than 40 Foundations from all parts of the world! Lately, the US based ClimateWorks Foundation joined the network • • • Joint statement (http://www.foundations-20.org/news.html) of various G20 stakeholder groups and the F20 platform has been published • • • Preparations for the High Level Event at the town hall of Hamburg on July 4th (http://www.foundations-20.org/events.html) are under full steam. Among the speakers will be Laurence Tubiana (ECF), John Schellnhuber (PIK), Lord Nicholas Stern, Kurt Bock (CEO of BASF and representative of the Business 20 group) and Barbara Hendricks, Germanys Minister of Environment.
FIND OUT MORE ABOUT F20 (http://www.foundations-20.org/news.html)
UPCOMING EVENTS
img
Charity Concert in Berlin, Germany
Monday, 4 September, 7:00 pm
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Film by Christoph J Kellner / studio animanova. Recently, we published an illustrative film that shows how implementing 100% Renewable Energy is the cheapest and fastes way to leave no one behind - and thus to meet the Sustainable Development Goals. Watch the vide (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ejUojjU-Msc&t=13s) o THE PHILIPPINES’ TUBBATAHA REEFS NATURAL PARK ACT http://www.futurepolicy.org/oceans/tubbataha-reefs/ With the first UN Ocean Conference taking place in June, we are happy to see that the health of our oceans and seas getting more attention. With our policy of the month, we are presenting an exemplary policy in marine environment conservation. READ MORE (http://www.futurepolicy.org/oceans/tubbataha-reefs/) HOW DO TRADE AGREEMENTS THREATEN WATER? https://canadians.org/wfs If the 2010 UN resolution recognizing water as a human right is to be realized, water in all its forms must be removed from all kind of trade and investment deals forever. In her new report, our WFC Councillor Maude Barlow is reflecting on water control. READ FULL REPORT (https://canadians.org/wfs) BRAND NEW PUBLICATIONS Our new report about debt and assets helps to understand the balance of global wealth and debt by illustrating the important distinction of the individual and the macroeconomic perspective on the economy. Read more (https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/debt-asset-macroeconomic-perspective/) Financial institutions and governments are keen to stress that regulation should not unnecessarily burden the financial sector. How can the public interest be effectively protected and strengthened? Read more (https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/financial-market-reform-strengthening-public-interest/) How can climate vulnerable countries scale up the transition to 100% RE while eradicating poverty? This report suggests concrete political measures, experiences and recommendations by Tanzanian stakeholders. Read more (https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/roadmap-100-re-poverty-eradication-tanzania/) Want to make a difference in 2017? Become a WFC Supporter! We give a voice to future generations and stand up for their rights by providing policy tools to empower millions of people around the world. Become a supporter to make the world a more sustainable place. MORE INFORMATION (https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/supporter/) Contact us World Future Council Lilienstraße 5-9 Hamburg 20095 Germany info@worldfuturecouncil.org (mailto:info@worldfuturecouncil.org) About this newsletter This newsletter is published monthly. Please activate the function "picture download" in your email programme and add our details to your trustworthy addresses so that this newsletter will not be categorized as spam. https://www.facebook.com/wfc.goodpolicies/ https://twitter.com/Good_Policies https://www.linkedin.com/company/world-future-council webversion (http://us6.campaign-archive2.com/?e=&u=3dc995b2a74416330219789bf&id=25b48e169e) | unsuscribe (http://worldfuturecouncil.us6.list-manage1.com/unsubscribe?u=3dc995b2a74416330219789bf&id=8c7b1a5945&e=&c=25b48e169e) This email was sent to annette.diegel@worldfuturecouncil.org (mailto:annette.diegel@worldfuturecouncil.org) why did I get this? (http://worldfuturecouncil.us6.list-manage.com/about?u=3dc995b2a74416330219789bf&id=8c7b1a5945&e=&c=25b48e169e) unsubscribe from this list (http://worldfuturecouncil.us6.list-manage2.com/unsubscribe?u=3dc995b2a74416330219789bf&id=8c7b1a5945&e=&c=25b48e169e) update subscription preferences (http://worldfuturecouncil.us6.list-manage.com/profile?u=3dc995b2a74416330219789bf&id=8c7b1a5945&e=) World Future Council · Lilienstrasse 5-9 · Hamburg 20095 · Germany

10 Years World Future Council Publication

Abstract

2017 marks the 10th anniversary of the World Future Council. As we look into the future – to new challenges and opportunities – we want to take a moment to celebrate the impact and success of the past decade.

Climate change, the destruction of the environment and continued wars are just some of the signs that today’s civilization is living at the expense of future generations. We can and need to initiate an orderly transition to a regenerative, resilient and flourishing future.

 

WFC China Program Annual Report 2016

China_Annual-Report_2016

Abstract

Judged by either its speed or scale, China has fully exceeded developed countries in urbanization progress. The magnificent scale of cities and rapid urbanization in China make sustainable development a priority that not only concerns Chinese policy-makers, but also draws attentions from the entire world. The WFC launched the Regenerative Cities program in 2015 to stand with China in meeting the inevitable challenges that occur during sustainable urbanization reform. After one year of trial and error, 2016 marked the second year since the WFC initiated the Regenerative Cities program.

This report captures the full scope of the project in 2016. We are very proud to share these achievements with you and look forward to the journey ahead.

Bringing Europe closer to its citizens

A regional approach to achieving a European Renewable Energy Union

In times of rising populism, internal cleavages and climate scepticism across EU Member States, Europe needs to reconnect with its citizens. Uniting the continent and re-gaining people´s trust in the European integration has never been more relevant. In fact, building a European Renewable Energy Union with regions, cities, municipalities and indeed citizens at its core could be the vehicle to realize this goal. The idea of regional cooperation can fill the ambition gap between national energy strategies and a standardized EU-wide approach. For MEP Claude Turmes, rapporteur of EU´s renewable energy governance reform, the direction is clear: “We are stronger together. [..) Can we think of a more positive project than local energy citizens?” And Brendan Devlin from DG Energy in the European Commission adds “We now see that individuals and communities are the actors that can bring us to meet the Paris Agreement goals”.

EU legislation must foster regional cooperation on the sub-national level.

So, what is needed to put words into action? In a policy debate on cross-border cooperation for renewable energy, organized by the Heinrich Boell Foundation EU and the World Future Council, hosted by the European Committee of the Regions, about 50 policy makers and key energy stakeholders concluded that EU legislation must foster regional cooperation on the sub-national level. While the “Clean Energy Package for All Europeans” only supports member states to collaborate on renewable energy development and to interconnect the transmission grid across borders, municipalities and regions lack political support.

Policy Debate on enhancing cross-border renewables cooperation in the EU. Brussels, June 6th 2017.

The project “Smart Energy Union Emmen Haren” (SEREH), which aims at building a regional, decentralized and mostly community-owned cross-border energy system, is a living example of the untapped potential that micro-level cooperation can unlock in accelerating the pace of energy transition in Europe. It is also illustrative of the current regulatory and legal barriers that local and regional pioneers are facing on the ground. “The current regulation is based on centralized systems that work top-down, while we need a distributed system that works bottom-up”, says Melinda Loonstra from the Dutch municipality Emmen. Emmen and its German neighbour Haren want to build a cross-border interconnection between their local renewable energy markets to become carbon neutral. “This link can help to build up a robust, reliable and affordable energy supply based on renewable sources in the Netherlands and Germany.” A direct exchange of electricity between the two regions could be the first step to another type of electricity market – a market where communities and small producers can trade their own energy via a digital platform. This micro-level form of cooperation could bring various advantages for European citizens: community-owned energy sources, keeping revenues in the region, reducing transport costs through local production and use, more affordable energy and the emergence of new businesses. One of the biggest challenges that Emmen and Haren are facing is conflicting national regulation on interconnection. And according to European law, only the Transmission System Operator (TSO) is permitted to transport electricity across border on the high-voltage grid. Also, legislative proposals that are currently discussed in the European parliament do not allow local DSOs to build interconnections on the medium-voltage grid between two countries.

According to Roberto Zangrandi, Secretary General of EDSO for Smart Grids, contradicting and diverse regulatory frameworks are indeed the biggest impediments to a rapid evolution of local networks. Depending on the respective national policies, the autonomy of the DSOs varies from country to country. In addition, the different support schemes, permitting procedures and administrative rules on the two sides of the borders also pose significant obstacles to the cross-border interaction between neighbouring regions or municipalities. Despite the possibilities for European funding of cross-border projects, these funds are in most of the cases considered out of reach for local actors, mostly due to co-financing and the complexity of application and reporting.

It is local actors that catalyse change.

However, it is exactly these local actors that catalyse change. As Jan Carsten Gjerløw from the Akershus County Council, Norway highlighted in the policy debate: “I think citizens and regions are actually the most important drivers. And we will see that governments and law, they will come after, they will follow up.” The City of Oslo has improved air quality standards, which has been the driving force behind the development of new national low carbon solutions in the transport sector. Also Susanne Nies, Corporate Affairs Manager with ENTSO-E underlines that local actors are at the frontline of innovation. “TSOs, regulators and national governments work in a triangle. The local level has to push this triangle.” Meanwhile, Magdalena Jaworska-Dużyńska from the Polish city Karlino highlighted that it is not only the big cities but also the small towns and municipalities that need political support. “People in Karlino want to be green and do more than the national government. But for this, we need Europe´s support.”

According to Claude Turmes, there should be an obligation to incorporate multi-level governance dialogue in the current legislation. The concrete proposal in the new governance regulation aims at establishing a permanent multi-level energy dialogue platform gathering among others regional and local authorities, civil society actors, business communities and investors to discuss different energy scenarios and shape the development of national energy and climate plans is a step in the right direction. It is now essential that Member States will institutionalize this dialogue in the legislative framework.

“The sky is the limit with this EGTC tool.”

A very concrete and in fact promising tool to support local actors especially in border regions is the European Grouping of Territorial Cooperation (EGTC). This tool has been designed to facilitate cross-border, trans-national or interregional cooperation in any sector. Regarding renewable energy, the EGTC can provide subnational frontrunner regions with regulatory support and flexibility to adopt a specific framework of rules and regulation in a specific cross-border territory. By creating one single legal entity to attract funding for cross-border areas, the tool will not be dependent on political changes at national level and could bring benefits directly to local communities without the need to involve national governments. This could simplify the complex and cumbersome administrative procedures and enable local and regional actors to develop long-term strategies in the context of a more stable regulatory environment. “The sky is the limit with this EGTC tool”, comments Slaven Klobučar from the European Committee of the Regions.

Alexandra Lafont speaking at the Policy Debate in Brussels on June 6th.

Aiming to strengthen territorial cohesion during its Presidency, the Luxembourg government launched further proposals for improving this legal tool that would allow cooperating cross-border regions to set up their own set of fitted legislation for a specific area or project. In this way, two municipal entities on both sides of the border could negotiate a specific regional legislative agreement that could be reviewed and approved by the national states before it becomes binding. While it would not deprive Member States from sovereignty, it will give possibilities to regions to “pull legislation from one side of the border to the other” and become “living laboratories”. The improved tool could also provide legal certainty to bottom-up initiatives, ensure better control of the outcomes, accelerate the adoption of new rules and promote cross-border experimentation zones. The next step in the process is the implementation of this tool. “The ball really lies with the Commission”, explains Frederick Richters from the Government of Luxembourg. In order to bring these concrete suggestions to fruition, the Commission has to turn them into a legislative proposal, for example, through incorporating them into the EU cohesion policy package.

One of Luxembourg´s supporters in this process is Alexandra Lafont from Mission Opérationelle Transfrontalière. “Often people do not even know which people to speak to on the other side of the border. This is why they need platforms and institutions” , she points out in the policy dialogue in Brussels. In fact, in a Europe that is close to its citizens, EU institutions should be seen not only as a regulator but rather as an enabler that brings together various actors at different levels, promotes an interactive exchange through an institutionalized dialogue and facilitates access to financing for small towns and municipalities and community-owned projects. “Europe is more than legislation” , says Brendan Devlin from DG Energy in the European Commission. “Even though it will be difficult to move from a regulator towards an enabler of policy outcomes, this is what we need.” 

– Radostina Primova (Heinrich Boell Foundatin EU Office), Maren Preuss (Heinrich Boell Foundatin EU Office) and Anna Leidreiter (World Future Council) –

 

To watch the recording of the full policy debate that took place on 6 th June 2017 in the Committee of the Regions in Brussels, please click here. You can also find some photos here and more background information about the topic and other activities in this programme here.