Unlocking the trillions to finance the 1.5°C limit

Abstract

In order to meet the +1.5 ° C limit specified in the Paris Agreement, a shift of the global energy supply to 100% renewable energy is necessary at the latest by 2050. Such a process requires annual investments in the order of $1.5 to $2 trillion. Although the costs of renewable energies (RE) have recently declined sharply and further downturns can be expected, current investments are stagnating at approximately $250 billion. Therefore, additional monetary support must be provided, in order to bring the global expansion of RE to the necessary scale.

This report outlines how it can be established through cooperation between the non-industrialized countries, the Multilateral Development Banks (MDBs), the Green Climate Fund (GCF), or other financial institutions, and the Central Banks of the industrialized countries.

Sufficient, healthy food for all – new handbook

The vision of the Namibian capital Windhoek is that all of its citizens enjoy food and nutrition security. This means that enough and healthy food is available in the city and that all of Windhoek’s citizens can afford it. By producing food in and around the city, we can connect the production with the market, with ideas and solutions, and engage people of all ages and all walks of life. With this handbook, we want to help build a more vibrant urban agriculture in cities like Windhoek to fight hunger and malnutrition in a sustainable way.

New Council Members elected

Every five years, the Councillors and Honorary Councillors of the World Future Council are being elected. This year it was election time again and there are some changes to our council. We are delighted to welcome four new Councillors, one new WFC Ambassador and a new member of the WFC Supervisory Board. At the same time, we would like to thank those who are now leaving the World Future Council for their successful and inspiring work and for their commitment to the mission of the World Future Council.

The new Councillor Victoria Tauli-Corpuz is UN Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous People. The activist and human rights advocate has been campaigning for the rights of indigenous peoples and women’s rights since the 1970s. Pauline Tangiora has been the expert for the topic so far. She now will serve as Honorary Councillor.

Charlotte Aubin was also elected Councilor of the WFC. Charlotte is an entrepreneur and founder of GreenWish Partners and the GreenWish Foundation. The Foundation’s main objective is to foster and support social initiatives and solar electrification programmes such as schools and hospitals in rural areas, mainly in Africa.

Moreover, Helmy Abouleish will from now on serve as Councilor. Helmy Abouleish is managing director of the SEKEM Initiative in Egypt, founded by his father Ibrahim Abouleish founded in 1977. SEKEM and Ibrahim Abouleish received the Alternative Nobel Prize (Right Livelihood Award) in 2003. For years, Helmy Abouleish has been involved in national and international policies on responsible competition, social entrepreneurship and worked towards combating climate change and hunger.

With Neshan Gunasekera, a lawyer and educationist complements the Council. Neshan was the former Director (2007-2012) of the Centre set up by late Judge C.G. Weeramantry. Neshan advises many international organizations. He is committed to bring communities together for environmental protection, healing and conservation through the use of intergenerational, holistic and experiential learning.

The World Future Council was able to win over Gerhard Stübe as a new ambassador. Stübe is head of the Festspielhaus Bregenz, where the annual meeting of the WFC Council members took place in 2017. Sustainability of events is at the centre of his work.

Tina Stridde will be joining the Supervisory Board of the World Future Council with immediate effect. She is also managing director of the Aid by Trade Foundation, an umbrella organization of the Cotton Made in Africa Initiative. We are confident that with her commitment and focus on sustainable consumption and global value chains, she fits perfectly with the WFC.

We would like to welcome everybody to the World Future Council. We look forward to a good cooperation and to the input of these interesting people.

Media Contact

World Future Council
Miriam Petersen
Media & Communications Manager
miriam.petersen@worldfuturecouncil.org
Phone: +49 40 30 70 914-19

From Degraded Drylands to Green Landscapes

A Homage to the Future Policy Award 2017 at the UN in Geneva

On October 31st, 2017, the United Nations in Geneva paid tribute to the Future Policy Award 2017. The UN Library in Geneva partnered with the World Future Council, the UN Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD), the Permanent Mission of Ethiopia to the United Nations, the University of Oxford’s Enacting Global Transformation Initiative, the Theatre of Transformation Academy and Green Cross International to host an event entitled From Degraded Drylands to Green Landscapes featuring a unique format of theatre, testimonies and a high-level roundtable dialogue.

Read more

Event: From Degraded Drylands to Green Landscapes

What is in Land Restoration for Youth and Sustainable Peace?

Special Event With The Winners Of Future Policy Award 2017

When? Tuesday 31 October 2017, 12:30-14:00

Where? UNOG Library Events Room B. 135
Palais des Nations, Geneva

Desertification is one of today’s most serious environmental challenges. Every minute, we lose the equivalent of 30 football fields of soil to degradation. We urgently need to act.
Can we empower young people at risk? Can we transform drylands, the most conflict-prone regions of the world? The Future Policy Awardees 2017 and renowned speakers show that we can. Through a compelling combination of a high-level discussion with distinguished experts, a multi-cultural performance, and an interactive dialogue with the audience, this special event shows how the destructive drama of desertification can become a constructive theatre of land restoration. This year, the Future Policy Award was organized by the World Future Council in partnership with the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD).

A discussion with

Ousséni Diallo, President, Green Cross, Burkina Faso
Atinkut Mezgebu Wubneh, Head of Agriculture and Rural Development Bureau, Tigray, Ethiopia
Pradeep Monga, Deputy Executive Secretary, United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification
Alexandra Wandel, Director, Vice Chair of the Management Board, World Future Council

Moderator

Rama Mani, Convenor, University of Oxford’s Enacting Global Transformation; Founder, Theatre of Transformation Academy; Councillor, World Future Council

Performance by Theatre Transformation Academy

Followed by a reception

For those without an access badge, registration for this event is obligatory.
Interested participants are invited to register online before 31 October 2017.

WFC Autumn News

NEWS FROM THE WFC IN OCTOBER

Dear Friends & Supporters,

Sustainable development can only be reached when it is supported by the people and is enabled by an appropriate policy framework. This month, we have put a focus on Tanzania where through our work, African and international decision-makers get insights into smart, future-just policy making:

Strengthening the rights of the children, especially in developing countries, is the aim of our upcoming conference in Zanzibar. Earlier this month, we and our partners published a study during a high-level conference in Daressalaam, proving that 100% renewable energy is the cheapest option for Tanzania to become a middle-income country by 2050: two test cases that can be applied to other developing countries.
Jakob von Uexkull & Alexandra Wandel
The Management Board
SCIENTIFIC PROOF FOR DEVELOPMENT BENEFITS OF 100% RE (https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/100re-low-cost-option-for-tanzania/)

The WFC, alongside with Brot fur die Welt and Climate Action Network Tanzania, has launched a 100% renewable energy scenario for Tanzania. The research conducted by the Institute for Sustainable Futures (ISF), Sydney, proves that there is great potential in renewable energies (RE) to be a power tool for sustainable development.
READ PRESS RELEASE (https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/100re-low-cost-option-for-tanzania/) https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/p/2017-desertification/
INTERNATIONAL CHILD RIGHTS CONFERENCE IN ZANZIBAR (https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/child-rights-conference/)

Sharing best practice and policy on child protection, justice and participation: Following up on the Future Policy Award 2015, the WFC is now organizing an international child rights conference in Zanzibar from 28th until 30th November 2017, offering participants from across Africa and internationally a platform to learn from the Zanzibar example and exchange best practice examples from their home countries.
https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/child-rights-conference/MORE INFORMATION (https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/child-rights-conference/) https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/path-regenerative-cities/
CHINA: ON THE PATHWAY TO REGENERATIVE CITIES (https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/path-regenerative-cities/)

As part of the Sino-German Mayor Exchange, over 40 mayors from different provinces of China visited the World Future Council in Hamburg. The workshop’s aim was to inform about the experience with cities’ resilience, building regenerative and climate resilient cities and to exchange views on sponge cities.
READ MORE (https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/path-regenerative-cities/)
AS THE CRISIS ESCALATES, WE CAN LEARN FROM HISTORY (https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/as-the-crisis-in-north-korea-escalates-stanislav-petrovs_us_59ca2901e4b0b7022a646d8f)
https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/as-the-crisis-in-north-korea-escalates-stanislav-petrovs_us_59ca2901e4b0b7022a646d8f
In these days of American-North Korean saber-rattling, Stanislav Petrov’s legacy is as important as ever: back in 1983, the Soviet military officer's serenity saved the world from a nuclear war. Find out what history can teach us on Jakob von Uexkull's latest HuffPost article.
READ ARTICLE (https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/as-the-crisis-in-north-korea-escalates-stanislav-petrovs_us_59ca2901e4b0b7022a646d8f) http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/combating-desertification-why-we-must-take-up-this_us_59b27ae8e4b0bef3378cdf58
BRAND NEW PUBLICATIONS (https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/media-room/publications/) https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/media-room/publications/

Degrowth is not enough: Can our production systems become sustainable and balanced within our existing political and economic order? This is, in principle, possible.
Read more (https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/degrowth-alone-is-not-enough/)

Sustainable development can only be reached by transitioning to 100% Renewable Energy (RE). This paper describes the vital relationship between renewable energy (RE) and sustainable development.
Read more (https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/100-re-sustainable-development/)

We are looking back on 10 years of our work: Since 2007, the WFC is giving a voice to future generations and standing up for their rights by providing decision-makers with policy tools to secure a just and sustainable future
Read more (https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/10-years-world-future-council-publication/)
Want to make a difference?
Become a WFC Supporter!
We give a voice to future generations and stand up for their rights by providing policy tools to empower millions of people around the world. Become a supporter to make the world a more sustainable place.
MORE INFORMATION (https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/supporter/)
Contact us
World Future Council
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20095 Germany
info@worldfuturecouncil.org (mailto:info@worldfuturecouncil.org)
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100% renewable energy is low-cost option for Tanzania to become middle income country

PRESS RELEASE – Study released during political conference in Dar Es Salaam

Dar Es Salam, Tanzania, 17th October 2017 – By deploying 100% renewable energy, Tanzania can provide access to reliable energy for all its citizens, while increasing living standards to the level of industrialized countries by 2050. This is the conclusion of a scientific study that is released today in Dar Es Salaam by the Institute for Sustainable Futures (ISF) of the University of Technology Sydney (UTS), Climate Action Network Tanzania (CAN Tanzania), Bread for the World and the World Future Council (WFC). The study also reveals that generating electricity from renewable sources is about 30% cheaper than from fossil resources.

Read more

Announcement: International Child Rights Conference in Zanzibar

Sharing best practice and policy on child protection, justice and participation

Realising every child’s right to freedom from violence and to participation is a fundamental element of the Convention on the Rights of the Child. Recent estimates show that at least one billion children are victims of violence every year. Violence against girls and boys in all its forms compromises all children’s rights and leaves not only long-lasting scars on children’s lives but also weakens social and economic progress.

FPA 2015: Zanzibar’s Children’s Act is the winner of the Gold Award.

In 2009, Tanzania and its semi-autonomous island region of Zanzibar was one of the first countries in Africa to undertake a national study on violence against children. In response to its findings, and to streamline national child rights legislation, the Revolutionary Government of Zanzibar introduced a comprehensive children’s rights law. Zanzibar’s ‘Children’s Act’ was awarded the gold prize at our 2015 Future Policy Awards for its effective response to child abuse and violence and for its promotion and protection of child rights.

Following up on the awarding, the World Future Council is now organizing an international child rights conference in November in Zanzibar, offering participants, nominated by their ministries, from across Africa and internationally a platform to learn from the Zanzibar example and exchange best practice examples from their home countries.

 

Aims of the conference:

… to offer insights from Zanzibar’s Child Protection System and the Children’s Act to policy makers and technical experts from other jurisdictions

… to exchange best practice examples from countries across Africa and internationally on topics such as child rights, participation, child justice, protection and positive discipline

… to provide a platform and learn from each other and to mutually improve policies, practices and impacts for the benefit of children and young people, particularly those that are vulnerable

… to strengthen synergies and networks for multi-stakeholder dialogue and promote the ongoing improvement of child rights laws and policies through cross-border learning.

… to identify opportunities, trends and success factors for policy reform and progress in the child rights arena

International Child Rights Conference

Sharing best practice and policy on child protection, justice and participation

When?  28th – 30th November 2017

Where?   Zanzibar


Context of the conference:

With its specific target (16.2) on ending all forms of violence against children, ensuring their safety and protection as well as reiterating their rights to access justice and information, the 2030 Agenda adds further strong international impetus to ending violence against children. Good child rights laws, policies and practices and their effective implementation play a crucial role in meeting these aims and targets.

In the recent years, Zanzibar is increasingly working on the implementation of empowerment of children and women. A pioneering feature of the drafting phase of Zanzibar’s ‘Children’s Act’ was a child consultation process which provided young people with a strong role in the law’s development and led to a greater societal understanding of children’s rights. Another successful feature was the involvement of a wide range of relevant stakeholders (ministries, religious leaders, civil society groups etc) in the drafting phase and thereafter.

To promote a conducive policy environment to address child protection in Zanzibar a National Plan of Action to end violence against women and children (NAPVAC) (2011-2015), a national campaign and a child justice reform process were also undertaken. A very recent (2017) National Plan of Action to end Violence Against Women and Children (2017-2022) has also been introduced. Zanzibar’s Strategy for Growth and Reduction of Poverty (MKUZIII) stresses the importance of empowering women, protecting children, promoting gender equality and equity; all critical factors for Zanzibar’s economic and social transformation.

Contact

Kassid_square

Samia Kassid
Senior Project Manager

 

100% renewable energy and poverty reduction in Tanzania

The Project’s Vision

The goal of the project is to develop a coherent strategy on how to implement 100% RE as part of Tanzania’s Sustainable Low Carbon Development and Poverty Reduction Goals.

Through an inclusive and interactive approach engaging local stakeholders and key decision-makers in the energy transformation process in Tanzania, this project intends to:

  1. Inspire stakeholders and build up hands-on knowledge on how 100% RE adds value to local economic development and community sustainability
  2. Strengthen synergies, networks and platforms for multi-stakeholder dialogue and follow up at the national level among government, parliamentary committees, policy-makers, civil society, trade unions, churches and media on LCD, poverty reduction and 100% RE.
  3. Identify necessary legislation and policy reforms.


Policy Roadmap for 100% RE and Poverty Eradication in Tanzania

This report suggests concrete political measures and outlines necessary governmental action to operationalize Tanzania’s 100%RE and poverty eradication target.




Scenario: 100% RE for all in Tanzania

This scientific feasibility study unveils that deploying 100% renewable energy in Tanzania can provide access to reliable energy for all its citizens, while increasing living standards to the level of industrialized countries by 2050. It proves that generating electricity from renewable sources is about 30% cheaper than from fossil resources.

Activities

Kick-off workshop / February 2016

On February 25, 2016 The World Future Council, Bread for the World and CAN-Tanzania hosted the kick-off workshop in Dar es Salaam for our 18-month program in Tanzania.

The kick-off workshop brought together 15 Tanzanian thought-leaders from government, academia and civil society to identify opportunities for policy change on the particular topic. Among the confirmed participants was Gertrude Mongella, WFC Councilor and Special Advisor to the ECA Executive Secretary and UNESCO Director General. The workshop helped to build capacity and create ownership among Tanzanian opinion leaders for 100% RE as a tool for poverty reduction, as well as to strengthen synergies, networks and platforms for multi-stakeholder dialogue.

The valuable contributions and expertise of the participants enabled us to compile a solid report which you can find here. It gathers and summarizes the main interventions, perspectives and outputs made by the participants of the workshop. Hereby, this report further provides a description of the current energy policy debate and defines the starting point for discussing how to scale up RE to spur sustainable development and eradicate poverty in Tanzania.

Study Tour to Bangladesh / April 2016

As a major opportunity to bring forward the dialogue which already started during the kick-off workshop in Dar es Salaam, a study tour to Bangladesh was organized from April 17-23, 2016, chaired by Dr. Tawfiq-e-Elahi Chowdhury Bir Bikram, Bangladesh Ministry of Energy. The study tour brought together a group of 10 representatives from Tanzania national government, parliamentarians and civil society leaders in the renewable energy field in Tanzania. The goal was to learn about the Bangladesh experience in rapidly expanding first time access to electricity among its citizens with 100% renewable energy.

The tour was organized with the support of Bright Green Energy Foundation (BGEF), a leading renewable energy organization in Bangladesh which has been successfully working with Solar Home System, Solar Irrigation Pump, bio-gas, Improve Cook Stove, and women empowerment since 2010.

“This study tour changed our minds about the potential of Renewable Energy as an effective tool to provide energy access to all people. We need to bring the experience from Bangladesh to Tanzania, especially on developing a comprehensive finance model. It is our hope that this trip has just opened our doors and starts a long journey of collaborations and working together”. This was the conclusion of our Tanzanian delegation visiting WFC Councillor Dipal Barua and his team, learning about solar-home-systems, solar irrigation systems as well as biogas plants for cooking.

Consultation workshop / July 2016

On July 12th, Can Tanzania, The World Future Council and Bread for the World organised a consultation workshop in Dar es Salaam on 100% Renewable Energy for Poverty Reduction in Tanzania. Around 50 stakeholders from the Parliament, Government, Civil Society and Academia participated in the consultation workshop, outlining the determinants of change and policy formulation in the RE sector in Tanzania, the challenges to policy reform, and providing recommendations for the development of RE legislation and implementation.

The development of a more comprehensive legislative framework would not only make a significant contribution to the existing country’s energy production and supply system, but would also move Tanzania quickly towards achieving the goal of becoming a middle income country, as envisioned in the Tanzania National Development Vision 2025.

“We want to tackle the challenges that so many people in our country are facing every day,” says Doto Mashaka Biteko, Member of the Tanzanian Parliament and Chair of the Energy and Minerals Committee. “Therefore, the government is aiming to provide access to 50% of the population by 2020.”

Further, on July 15th, Can Tanzania, The World Future Council and Bread for the World, together with civil society representatives and faith-based organisations visited some examples of Solar Home Systems in Mabwepande, a suburb of Dar es Salaam in Tanzania.

100% Renewable Energy for Sustainable Development

Abstract

Sustainable development can only be reached by transitioning to 100% Renewable Energy (RE). This paper describes the vital relationship between renewable energy (RE) and sustainable development. In particular, it demonstrates how supporting the transition to 100% RE is both a necessary condition and a driver for sustainable development that leaves no one behind.

In fact, 100% RE is more than just replacing fossil with renewable sources in today’s energy system. It can serve as a means for socioeconomic development and help create an equitable society for today’s and future generations.